Spencer Douglass Crockwell

Artwork by Spencer Douglass Crockwell

Spencer Douglass Crockwell was born in Columbus, Ohio, on April 29, 1904. His family was a comfortable middle-class household: his mother the daughter of an attorney and his father a mining engineer. At the age of three, his family relocated to Saint Louis, Missouri, where he attended elementary school and then Washington University, studying business. As an undergraduate, Crockwell also took courses at the St. Louis School of Fine Arts, which ultimately prompted him to change his studies. 

Crockwell graduated with a business degree from Washington University in 1926; but he continued his studies at the School of Fine Arts until 1929. The next year, he relocated to Chicago to continue his studies at the American Academy of Art. Receiving a Traveling Fellowship, Crockwell studied in Europe in 1930 and 1931. He moved to Glens Falls, New York, in 1932, marrying Margaret Braman and raising a family in the town he considered his home for life. 

During the Depression years, Spencer Crockwell created three federally commissioned murals for the Works Progress Administration (WPA),.In 1937 he completed an oil on canvas mural entitled “Vermont Industries” for the White River Junction post office in Vermont. Crockwell painted another oil on canvas mural in 1938 entitled “Endicott: Excavating for the Ideal Factory” for the Endicott, New York post office.  His “Signing of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek” was completed in 1944 for the post office in Macon, Mississippi. 

The Finch Pruyn & Company,  the leading Glens Falls company in his home town, is the site for his 1934 “Paper Workers” mural. That same year Crockwell began experimenting in film making, initially creating low-cost flip-card animation films ween through a mutoscope. In the years 1936-1937, he created surrealistic films with his collaborator sculptor Dave Smith. 

The United States Brewers Foundation hired Crockwell in 1947 for its “Beer Belongs” campaign, whose goal was to make beer a part of a wholesome American lifestyle. The campaign ran for ten years producing 136 advertisements by various artists, roughly half which were done by Spencer Crockwell. Like Norman Rockwell during this period, Crockwell illustrated many cover illustrations for The Saturday Evening Post, sometimes just signing his work as Douglass. 

Spencer Crockwell was a founding trustee and the first director of The Hyde Collection, a respected art museum in Glens Falls, New York.. He received many awards, including the 1947 Art Directors Club of New York Gold Medal for best poster and the 1957 Los Angeles Art Directors Award for best painting. His paintings can be seen in many museums, public buildings, and in the permanent collection of The Smithsonian. 

Chip Whitehouse

The Artwork of Chip Whitehouse

Chip Whitehouse is a gay artist exploring in his artwork the theme of sexuality with its associated emotions. He studied Fine Art in the field of Oil Painting at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana,  and studied Fashion Design at the Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising in San Francisco, California.

 

James Stroudley

James Stroudley, “Rowing Men”, Date Unknown, Oil on Canvas, 107 x 86 cm, Private Collection

James Stroudley was a London-born painter, printmaker, and teacher. He studied at the Clapham School of Art between 1923 to 1927, followed by attendance at the Royal College of Art from 1927 to 1930. His teachers at the Royal College included English painter and draughtsman Sir William Rothenstein and English painter Allan Gwynne-Jones. As a recipient of the first Abbey Scholarship Stroudley was able to spend three years in Italy from 1930, where he absorbed the influences of Giotto and Piero della Francesca. After this period, he produced one of the last wholly satisfying decorative cycles by a Rome Scholar of the period.

From the Second World War, in which he worked with the Camouflage Unit, James Stroudley taught at St Martin’s School of Art and was a visiting lecturer at the Royal Academy Schools. He became a member of the Royal Society of British Artists in 1934. Stroudley exhibited his works at the Royal Academy, the Royal Society of British Artists, and at the Royal Society of Painters, Etchers, and Engravers. 

James Stroudley’s solo shows in London were at the Apollinaire Gallery and  Arthur Tooth and Sons, which had a major presence in the commercial art market since the 1870s. Though he continued to live in London, his later work, exhibited at the Royal Academy from 1955, indicated regular painting trips to Kent and Sussex coasts. Stroudley’s later work in life changed from a traditional to a more abstract form.

James Stroudley’s work was influenced by a series of styles, ranging from early Italian artists to the Cubists. Through this, he achieved the incisive draughtsmanship that forms the basis of his art. Stroudley produced figure subjects, still life compositions, landscapes and abstracts with equal success. In 1971, his former student, Peter Coker, paid homage to Stroudley by including his work in the exhibition ‘Pupil & Masters’, held at Westgate House, Long Melford, Suffolk. He died in Wandsworth, London, in May of 1985.

Jimmy Scott

Born in Cleveland, Ohio, in July of 1925, James Victor Scott was an American jazz vocalist known for his sensitivity on ballads and for his high countertenor voice. The high range of his singing voice was due to a rare genetic disease, the Kallmann syndrome, which prevented him from reaching classic puberty and limited his physical height. 

Given the nickname of “Little Jimmy Scott” by jazz musician and band leader Lionel Hampton, Scott achieved prominence as the lead singer in Hampton’s band when he recorded “Everybody’s Somebody’s Fool” in December of 1949. This song became a top rhythm and blues hit in 1959. Scott sang the vocals on Charlie Parker’s adaption of Gershwin’s “Embraceable You” in 1947; however, his vocals was credited to the female vocalist Chubby Newsom on the album.

Jimmy Scott signed in 1963 with Tangerine Records, a record label owned by Ray Charles and distributed by ABC-Paramount Records. Under that label, he recorded the album “Falling in Love is Wonderful”, with Ray Charles interplaying on the piano. This ranks as one of the best works of Scott’s career, showing his range of emotions and his hitting all the notes with perfection on such classics as “How Deep is the Ocean” and “Someone to Watch Over Me”.

By the late 1960s, Jimmy Scott’s career had faded; he returned to his native Cleveland and worked in several menial labor positions. It wasn’t until 1989 that he returned to music, sharing a late-night billing with singer and pianist Johnnie Ray at the famed New York’s Ballroom. Singing at the funeral of his friend, blues singer and songwriter Doc Pomus, gained him further recognition and an opportunity with Sire Records. 

Sire Records, an arm of the Warner Records group, released Jimmy Scott’s 1992 album “All the Way” which earned Scott a nomination for a Grammy Award. Between 1994 and 1998, Jimmy Scott released three albums: the 1994 “Dreams”, “Heaven” released in 1996, and an album of pop/ rock interpretations entitled “Holding Back the Years”. This last album earned an award for Best Jazz Album of 2000, and included covers of songs written by Prince, Lennon, Elvis Costello, and Elton John and Bernie Taupin.

Jimmy Scott’s early recordings for Decca Records and Savoy Records were re-released as a box set in 1999. He signed with Milestone Records in 2000 and recorded four albums with guests such as Wynton Marsalis, Renne Rosnes, and Lewis Nash. His final recording took place at his home in May of 2014, a track written for him by Grégoire Maret titled “The 26th of May” which appears on Maret’s album “Wanted”.

Scott performed at the inaugurations of both President Eisenhower and William Clinton, singing “Why Was I Born”. He received the NEA Jazz Masters award in 2007, and the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Jazz Foundation of America in 2010. Jimmy Scott was inducted into the Rhythm and Blues Hall of Fame in 2013. He died in his sleep at his home in Las Vegas on June 12, 2014 at the age of eighty-eight years. He is buried in Knollwood Cemetery in Mayfield Heights, Ohio.

“As singers, we all deal in pain. We’re all trying to push the pain through the music and make it sound pretty. Jimmy Scott has more pain and prettiness in his voice than any singer anywhere”- Ray Charles

 

Erin Hanson

Beginning her study of oil painting as a child, Erin Hanson marked her appreciation for impressionism with her first viewing of Vincent van Gogh’s “Irises”. She began, at the age of twelve, her study of acrylic paint techniques  working at a mural studio. A high school scholarship enabled Hanson to study figure drawing at the Otis College of Art and Design in Los Angeles, California. After graduating, she attended UC Berkeley where she obtained a degree in Bioengineering. 

Erin Hanson’s treks through the lands and national parks of Nevada, Utah and Colorado inspired many of her landscape paintings. Immersing herself in her artwork, she has painted consistently since her graduation from college. Hanson uses a minimalist technique of impasto painting, layering wet paint strokes upon previous wet strokes, with color palettes of four to five colors for control. Her work focuses primarily on landscapes shown with a boldness of light and color. Hanson currently lives and works in Los Angeles, California.

The Tempest

Benjamin Smith, “Act One, Scene One of the Tempest by William Shakespeare”, Untinted Engraving based on the Original Painting by George Romney, September 29, 1797, Published by J & J Boydell at the Shakespeare Gallery, Pall Mall, London

This engraving depicts the destruction of King Alonso’s ship caused by the tempest conjured by Prospero, seen on the right, who sent spirits to create the storm. Prospero caused the tempest in an act of revenge against his brother Antonio, one of the ship’s passengers, who had ursurped Propero’s position as Duke of Milan. Prospero’s daughter Miranda clings to him, begging for the lives of those on the ship. Prospero assured his daughter that he used his magic to prevent anyone from dying.

Benjamin Smith was a British engraver, publisher and print seller who was born in 1754 in London. He studied the art of stippling engraving under Francesco Bartolozzi,  one of the most famous engravers of the 1700s. During his career from 1786 to 1833, Smith engraved many plates from designs by William Hogarth, William Beechley, and George Romney. He also created portraits of the aristocracy such as the Marquis Cornwallis and King George III.

Employed for many years by J & J Boydell Publishing, Benjamin Smith was commissioned to engrave many plates for the Shakespeare Gallery and for the poetical works of John Milton in the years between 1794  and 1797. These are considered his best works and included the image above based on the painting by George Romney. Smith continued his engraving work until five years before his death in 1833, producing many works now in the collections of the British Museum and National Portrait Gallery.

Ethan Murrow

 

Ethan Murrow received his B.A. in Studio Arts with a focus on painting and printmaking from Carleton College in Minnesota. His Master of Fine Arts degree in drawing, painting and sculpture was awarded by the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. Murrow is currently living in Boston where he is a professor at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts at Tufts University.

Ethan Murrow creates large-scale graphite drawings that are translated form film and photographic narratives. His rendered drawings focus on innovative and explorative characters attempting with confidence and passion to succeed in their endeavors, despite the unlikely outcomes. Murrow incorporates the art of perspective with great skill; his use of vantage points render the scenes real but intentionally absurd. 

Murrow’s drawings are dependent on still captured photographic images. They resemble the look and feel of early cinema and black and white photography due to their grainy surface appearance and use of gray scale tones. The process of drawing is extensive, The sense of depth is developed by complex layering and mark-making, filling large areas of space on the drawing surface, sometimes measuring up to fourteen feet wide.

Ethan Murrow’s series “Zero Sum” consists of a body of work centered around the same single figure shown in different positions as the figure hurtles upward or falls downward through the air. The heavily bandaged figure appears poised in the air, contorted but floating peacefully. A combination of both awkwardness and beauty is achieved in this series.

Drawing inspiration from contemporary literature and historical articles of Victorian-era exploration and voyages, Murrow plays with these romanticized stories that hid the grim realities and human mistakes, by depicting a new set of explorers who are foolhardy and quite apt to fail. His “Narwhal Hoax” series shows pseudo-scientists faking their expeditions; his “Doomed Explorer” series show explorers on oddball quests who never show any doubt of success. 

Ethan Murrow’s work is represented by Obsolete Gallery, in Venice Beach, California; Winston Winston Wächter Fine Art, in New York City and Seattle; and La Galerie Particulière, in Paris. His work in in collections worldwide, including the Guggenheim Foundation. 

 

Nick Robles

Nick Robles is a self-taught freelance graphic artist from southern Louisiana. His main medium is digital art; however, he has also created artwork in the fields of sculpture and oil painting. Robles acknowledges many and varied influences on his artwork, from illustrators J. C. Leyendecker and Norman Rockwell to comic artist Mike Mignola and Pre-Raphaelite artist J. W. Waterhouse.

In 2014 Nick Robles started working with BOOM! Studios producing illustrations and cover art for their publications, including the 2014 “Clockwork Angels”, the covers of “Kong of Skull Island”, and work on the 2015 “Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials”. He worked with ECW Press, a Toronto-based independent book publisher, in 2015 on Kevin Anderson’s graphic novel “Clockwork Lives”. Robles also did artwork for both Black Crown Publishing and Dark Horse Comics. He is currently working with both Necromancer Press and Vault Comics.

Nick Robles is the co-creator along with author Tini Howard of Black Crown Publishing’s new graphic series “Euthanauts”, a sci-fi graphic adventure into the frontier of death. Robles created memorable characters with crisp details using a palette of warm and cool colors to indicate the living and the dead. His art on this series presents an atmosphere that is both modern and dark, with experiments in panel layouts and the design of the page. There are currently five issues in the series availabe from Black Crown Publishing.

The images above are Nick Robles’s work for the Marvel X-Men series, illustrating the character of Kurt Wagner, known as the Nightcrawler, a superhuman agile mutant with the ability to teleport.

 

 

Simão César Dordio Gomes

Simão César Dordio Gomes , “Dois Banhistas a Beira do Douro (Two Bathers on the Banks of the Douro)”, 1928, Oil on Canvas, Location Unknown

Born in 1890 at Arraiolos, Spain, Simão César Dordio Gomes enrolled at the Academy of Fine Arts in Lisbon, attending until 1910. He studied under the Portuguese painter Luciano Freire and the Naturalist painter Veloso Salgado, also from Portugal. Gomes’s early works show the influence of the Portuguese Realist painter Columbeno with his use of somber tones of color.

After a year in Paris during which he attended the Julian Academy and was exposed to Portuguese Modernist art, Dordio Gomes decided to return to his hometown of Arraiolos. He stayed there for ten years, painting in the traditional regionalist style that he was previously taught. A second stay in Paris from 1921 to 1926, now an international scene, shifted the style of Gomes’s work towards a more modernist approach. Putting aside the traditional naturalism, he embraced the colors and forms of the works of Cézanne and even made experiments in Cubism.

Dordio Gomes returned once again to Portugal, taking up the regionalist theme for his work. However, this time, his work carried the influence of Cézanne’s exuberant colors and boldness of form. He produce many landscapes of the Alentejo region during the following six years. In 1934 Dordio Gomes became a teacher of painting at the Superior School of Fine Arts in Oporto, Portugal, teaching a new generation of modern artists.

During his stay in Oporto, located in the northern regions of Portugal, Dordio Gomes’s paintings took on the softer palette of the landscape. His preferred theme for his work became the landscapes and the people of the Douro River Valley area. It was during this period that Dordio Gomes took up the art of fresco painting, a desire he had since seeing the frescos of Italy in his early life travels. He continued teaching at the School of Fine Arts in Oporto until his retirement in 1960.

Johan Wahlstrom

Featured Image: “Worn Out”, 2016, Urethane, Color Pigment on Canvas, 40 x 30 Inches

Images from left to right: “Room Mates”, 2016, Acrylic, Urethane, Color Pigments on Canvas, 30 x 30 Inches; “Life is Now”, 2016, Urethane, color Pigments on Canvas, 94 x 59 Inches

Born in Stockholm, Johan Wahlstrom is a fifth-generation Swedish artist who began his creative life as a keyboardist and singer, performing with his own band as well as with musicians Ian Hunter and Graham Parker. Leaving the music stage after twenty years, he moved to a small village in France and began to pursue a life of visual art, painting part of the time under the tutelage of Swedish artist Lennart Nyström.

Inspired by the Art Brut movement and particulary Jean Dubuffet and Paul Klee, Johan Wahlstrom creates works combining abstraction and figurative forms. In his more figurative and narrative paintings, Wahlstrom presents his social and political commentaries; a strong critique of authoritarianism and fascism is a recurring theme that appears in many of his dark images of the contemporary world.

Johan Wahlstrom came to New York in 2015 and is currently living and working in Jersey City, New Jersey, with a studio located at the Mana Contemporary Arts Facility. He also has a second studio in Marbella, Spain. Wahlstrom started his theme of distorted faces in 2008 with his exhibition in Barcelona entitled “It’s Boring to Die”, which contained the above images. He continued this series until 2014, with exhibitions in New York, Bonn, and Zurich. This series had a limited pallette of colored pigments, mixing his distorted faces with layers of abstraction, gradually becoming more complex in the presentation.

 

Shepard Fairey

Shepard Fairey was born in Charleston, South Carolina, in 1970. He graduated in 1988 from the Idyllwild Arts Acacemy in Palm Springs, California. Fairey earned his Bachelor of Fine Arts from the Rhode Island School of Design in 1992. He is one of the most infuential street artist of our time. His art ranges from screen prints, stencils, and stickers to posters, paintings and murals. His most famous art includes the Obey trademark, images of Andre the Giant, and the propaganda poster of Barack Obama.

Shepard Fairey’s work combines the elements of graffiti, pop art, business, Marxist theory and advertisement. The imagery is conveyed in strong graphic renderings with a color pallette of mostly reds, blacks, and whites. His art is distinctly political in nature and supportive of social causes.

Hideo Takeda

Hideo Takeda, , “Yoshisune, Escape from Kyoto”, Date Unknown, Silkscreen, The Genpei War Series “Battle of the Genji and the Heike”, Edition of 185

Hideo Takeda was born in Osaka, Japan in 1948. He attended Tokyo’s Tama Fine Arts University, graduating in 1973 with an Master of Arts in Sculpture. Inspired by American-style cartoons and illustrations, he decided to become a cartoonist. His graduation submission for Tama Fine Arts University was a self-published book entitled “Madam Chen’s Chinese Restaurant” which consisted of one-panel cartoons. In his later years, he continued publishing one-panel collections including the 1976 “Opera Glass”, the 1986 “Sketchbook of 100 Kinds of Professions”, and the 1987 “The Poisons”.

At the age of twenty-seven, after giving several one-man shows of his work, Takeda won the Bungeishunju Manga-sho Award for his portfolio “Monmon”, a collection of eleven silkscreens focusing on the art of tattoos. In 1985, one of his best known silkscreens, “The Mark of the Fan”, showing an ancient warrior riding a horse through blue waves, appeared on the cover of art historian Lawrence Smith’s “Contemporary Japanese Prints: Symbols of a Society in Transition”. This print was one of Takeda’s Gempie series which marked the 800th anniversary of the Battle of Dan-no-Ura, the climax of the civil war between the Taira and Minamoto families.

In 1993 at the British Museum, Hideo Takeda had the first one-man show dedicated to the Japanese art of manga, entitled “Takeda Hideo and the Japanese Cartoon Tradition”. Manga, developed in Japan in the late 18th century, are graphic novels of illustrative panels presenting a broad range of genres from comedy and historical to horror and erotica. Takeda’s most recent works are a series of drawings and books titled “World Night Tours”, published in 2012.

 

 

Gloria Grahame

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Gloria Grahame in Fritz Lang’s 1954 “Human Desire”

Gloria Grahame Hallward, born November 28, 1923, was an American film star, singer, and stage and television actor. After appearing on Broadway for several years, she was signed to a contact with MGM Studios in 1944 . Two years after her film debut in “Blonde Fever”, she was given the role of flirty Violet Bick, saved from disgrace by Stewart’s George Bailey,  in the 1946 “It’s A Wonderful Life”. Her contract was then sold to RKO Studios in 1947 which featured her in several film noir pictures, portraying beautiful, flawed but seductive, women.

Gloria Grahame received an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actress for her role portraying Ginny Tremaine in the 1947 “Crossfire”, a film noir drama based on the theme of anti-Semitism. In 1950 she appeared with Humphrey Bogart in Columbia Pictures’ film “In a Lonely Place”, garnering praise from critics. Her very short role of nine minutes playing southern belle Rosemary Bartlow in the 1952 “The Bad and the Beautiful” won her the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress.

Grahame appeared in two films directed by Fritz Lang: the 1953 film noir “The Big Heat”, a crime drama co-starring Lee Marvin and Glenn Ford; and the 1954 film noir “Human Desire”, playing the femme fatale Vicki Buckley opposite her jealous film husband played by Broderick Crawford. As her film career began to wane, Grahame returned to the stage and made several guest appearances on television, including “The Twilight Zone” and “The Fugitive”.

After an initial bout with breast cancer in 1974, which had gone into remission, Gloria Grahame was again diagnosed with its return in 1980. Despite her failing health, she continued to work on stage in England and the United States. At the age of fifty-seven in 1981, Gloria Grahame was admitted to Saint Vincent’s Hospital in New York City, where she passed a few hours after admittance. She is buried at the Oakwood Memorial Park Cemetery in Los Angeles. For her work in the film industry, Gloria Grahame has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. An account of Grahame’s final years of life, based on recollections of actor Peter Turner, was presented in the 2017 film “Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool”.

Image reblogged with thanks to http://doctordee.tumblr.com

Duncan Grant

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Duncan Grant, “George Mallory”, 1913, Oil on Canvas, 22 x 25 Inches, Private Collection

Born in 1885 into a military family, Scotish painter Duncan James Corrowr Grant was a member of the Bloomsbury Group, an English group of artists and scholars associated with the French Bohemian Movement.  He studied at the St. Paul’s School in London and for five years attended the Westminster School of Art. Traveling abroad after finishing school, Duncan met and became apprenticed in 1906 to French painter Jacques-Émile Blanche, a successful self-taught portrait painter working in Paris and London.

Returning to England, Duncan Grant was introduced by his cousin Lytton Strachey to the Bloomsbury Group which included the Strachey brothers, Virginia Woolf , Vanessa Bell and her husband English art critic Clive Bell, and artist and art critic Roger Fry. This Modernist art group gathered to discuss philosophical and aesthetic questions, and believed in the value of truth and friendship. Open and shifting intimate relationships developed among its members, leading to Duncan fathering a child with Vanessa Bell. Although Vanessa was greatly in love with Duncan, he, an active and well-known gay man, had many relationships with other men, particularly in the Bloomsbury group.

Duncan Grant joined the London Group in 1919, changing his painting from abstraction to landscapes and still lifes. In 1920 he had his first of many solo shows in London. In 1922 Duncan and Vanessa Bell began producing furniture, textiles, and other interior designs. Now a renowned artist, he represented Great Britain at the Venice Biennale in the years 1926, 1932 and 1940. A revived interest in his work produced a retrospective exhibition in 1959 and another one-man show in 1975 in New York City.

At the age of sixty, Duncan Grant met the young Paul Roche, who became the main love of his late life. Duncan continued working on his art, mainly decorative projects and private commissions. His lover, Paul Roche, tended to his needs in his later years, until Duncan’s death by pneumonia at the age of ninety-three. He is buried beside Vanessa Bell in the churchyard of Saint Peter’s Church in West Firie, East Sussex, England.

The above painting of George Herbert Leigh Mallory, the mountaineer, is one of many portraits that Duncan Grant painted of his close friend. Mallory was a friend to many of the Bloomsbury Group, particularly with the English writer and critic Giles Lytton Strachey.

Jean-Léon Gérôme

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Jean-Léon Gérôme, “A Bischari Warrior”, 1872, Oil on Canvas, 41 x 33 cms, Private Collection

Jean-Léon Gérôme was a French painter and sculptor of the academicism style, painting historical themes, portraits, Greek mythology, and oriental and Middle-East themes. He studied under the historical painter Paul Delaroche and later attended the atelier of Charles Gleyre, a Swiss artist who took over Delaroche’s studio in 1843. Gérôme attended the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris but failed to enter the notable Prix de Rome due to inadequacy in his drawing skill.

Gérôme won a third-class medal at the 1847 Paris Salon Exhibition for his 1846 painting “The Cock Fight”, which is viewed as a high point of the Neo-Grec movement. He took a second-class medal at the 1948 Prix de Rome Exhibition for his painting “Bacchus and Cupid”. Gérôme received two important commissions between 1852 and 1854 which enabled him to widely travel: the large historical canvas, “The Age of Augustus”, for the court of Napolean III, and his “Last Communion of Saint Jerome” for the Church of Saint-Séverin in Paris.

Jean-Léon Gérôme visited Egypt in 1856 for the first time, traveling up the Nile to Cairo, across the Sinai Peninsula, and eventually to Damascus. This trip began the start of his many orientalist paintings depicting the Arab religion, landscapes of the North African regions, and genre life of the its peoples. He made multiple studies and sketches of the landscapes and gathered costumes and artefacts as studies for his oriental scenes. Between 1864 and 1904 Gérôme taught at his own atelier at the École des Beaux-Arts, one of three professors, teaching his students a progession of drawing skills before they were allowed to work in oils.

Jean-Léon Gérôme died in his atelier on the 10th of January 1904. He was found in front of a portrait of Rembrandt and close to his own painting “Truth Coming Out of Her Well”. At his own request, he was given a simple burial service. But the Requiem Mass given in his memory was attended by a former president of the Republic, most prominent politicians, and many painters and writers. Gérôme is buried in the Montmartre Cemetery in front of the statue “Sorrow” that he had cast for his son Jean who had died in 1891.

Miguel Viladrich Vila

Miguel Viladrich Vila (1887-1956) - Arab with goat. 1933.

Miguel Viladrich Vila, “Arab with Goat”, 1933, Oil on Canvas

Miguel Viladrich Vila was born in Torrelameu, Catalonia, Spain in 1887. In his early life, he studied architecture in Barcelona. Receiving a scholarship in 1907, Vila moved to Madrid and dedicated himself to painting. He traveled throughout Spain with sculptor Julio Antonio, sketching and painting gypsies and women wearing traditional costume. Vila went to Paris in 1909 and then onto Florence and Rome, studying the works of Botticelli and da Vinci. In 1910, Vila took part in Madrid’s National Exhibition of Fine Arts, entering his symbolist painting “My Funerals Presided Over by Death”.

Returning to Madrid, Vila frequented the New Cafe Levante, a gathering place for intellectuals, including the Spanish writer and dramatist Gomez de la Serna and painter Romero de Torres. In 1911, Vila produced his four painting series of “Gypsy of Seville”. Traveling with his friend and sculptor Julio Antonio, Vila met Catalan artist Anglada Camarasa, who helped both the artists with financial support. Villa exhibited works at the Annual Salon in Paris, selling works for the first time to Spanish and North American collectors.

Miguel Viladrich Vila travel as his reputation grew, throughout Spain, France, Italy and South America. While in Argentina he met Ana Morera, a painting teacher, whom he married in 1919. A trip to New York in 1926 resulted in the sale of thirty-six oil paintings to art patron Archer Milton Hutington, who established the first Hall of the Hispanic Society of America. In the decade of the 1930s, Vila traveled regularly to Morocco, painting a series of Moorish figures and tradesmen. He returned to Buenos Aires in 1940, where he remained until his death in 1956.

Images reblogged with thanks to http://thouartadeadthing.tumblr.com

Jean Giraud

 

 

Jean Giraud, known as Moebius, was a French artist, writer, and cartoonist who worked in the Franco-Belgian “Bandes Dessinees” tradition. These “drawn or strip stories” have been a long tradition in Belgium and France, becoming a major style on the comic scene starting in 1945. This style contains such comics as Herge’s “The Adventures of Tintin”, Goscinny and Uderzo’s “Asteix”, and Peyo’s “The Smurfs”.

Jean Giraud’s most famous works include the “Blueberry” series with writer Jean-Michel Charlier, featuring one of the first anti-heroes in Western comics. Under the name of Moebius, he created surreal, almost abstract style, fantasy and sci-fi comics, including the collection of short graphic stories entitled “Arzach” about a silent warrior who rides a pterodactyl creature. As Moebius, Giraud contributed concept designs and storyboards for the films “Alien”, “Tron”, “The Fifth Element”, and “The Abyss”. His designs for the Nostromo crew attire, and particulary the spacesuits, in Ridley Scott’s “Alien” were adopted by Scott and appeared onscreen as designed.

“The Eyes of the Cat” was Jean Giraud’s first collaboration with the filmmaker Alejandro Jodorowsky, who would become a close friend and co-author. The portfolio-sized, 56-plate book was actually never meant for widespread distribution. Rather, it was printed in a tiny quantity, as a bonus gift for friends and clients of French comic publishers Les Humanoides Associes  as a kind of internal thank you note. A very limited edition, the supply of the book was depleted before the demand for it was satisfied.

In the story, a cat is attacked by an eagle as it wanders through a decaying city in the future. Each of the twelve by sixteen inch black and white plates is detailed and gritty. The narrative of the story is text-free, full of violence and chaos. This was influenced by Alejandro Jodorowsky’s association with the Panic Movement, a surrealistic group which he founded in 1962. The group concentrated on chaotic and surreal performance art, staging violent events designed to be shocking in a response to the mainstream acceptance of surrealism.

Images reblogged with thanks to https://thefugitivesaint.tumblr.com

Johnny Warangkula Tjupurrula

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Johnny Warangkula Tjupurrula, “Water Dreaming Tjikari”, 1998, Acrylic on Linen, 121 x 182 cm

Johnny Warangkula Tjupurrula was born 1925 at Mintjilpirri, north-west of the Kangaroo Dreaming site of Ilpili waterhole. He was one of the founding members of the Western desert Aboriginal art movement. He was an extremely innovative artist who depicted traditional ceremonial ground designs as abstract depictions on canvas and board.

Warangkula’s painting career began after working as a labourer for many years building airstrips and settlements in Haasts Bluff. In return for his work building and labouring, he was remunerated with consumable goods. After moving from Haasts Bluff to Papunya, Warangkula served on the Papunya Council along with Mick Namarai, Limpi Tjapangati and Kingsley Tjumgarrayi.

During the 1960’s, Warangkula’s rapidly developed a distinctive style of his own which came to be known as ‘overdotting’. He uses several layers of dots to depict his dreaming’s, which consist of water, yam, fire and egret stories. This more painterly approach signified his expanding encounter with the outside world, creating effects that art patron Geoffrey Bardon called ‘tremulous illusion’.  Warangkula’s artworks are strictly Aboriginal stories without conscious European influence, they remain of major significance and are of considered of modern aesthetic.

David Seidner

David seidner from of fleeting and lasting interest

David Seidner, Title Unknown, “Dancers” Series, 1993, Gelatin Silver Print

American photographer David Seidner was known for his portraits and fashion photography. He had his first cover photo published at the age of nineteen; and at the age of twenty-one he had the first of many solo exhibitions of his work in Paris. He was under contract for Yves Saint Laurent in the 1980s and his work included fashion shoots for the French and Italian editions of leading magazines such as Vogue, Vanity Fair among others.

Seidner’s immense cultural knowledge influenced his timeless images. His nudes evoked Greek classical sculpture; his mid-1990s portraits were inspired by John Singer Sargent, Boldini and Valazquez; his portraits of artists recalled classical busts of Roman emperors. In its evolution, his work became more simple and pure, ending in his “Orchid” series shot with an auto-focus camera and color negative film.

David Seidner’s portrait of Helena Carter was selected for the millennial exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery in London, as one of the 100 great photographs of the century and received the 1999 Alfred Eisenstaedt Photograph of the Year Award. He had over a dozen solo exhibitions and was in many group shows at the Whitney Museum and the Pompidou Center in Paris. David Seidner died of complications of AIDS on June 6, 1999.

Image reblogged with thanks to http://doctordee.tumblr.com

 

 

Andreas Feininger

 

andreas feininger, skeleton of gaboon viper, 1952

Andreas Feininger, “Skeleton of Gaboon Viper”, 1952

Son of the late acclaimed artist Lyonel Feininger, American photographer Andreas Feininger was born in Paris in 1906, and graduated with highest honors in architecture from schools in Germany. At that time, Feininger was using a camera as his mechanical sketchbook for a reference aid in creating his building designs.

After a year’s work in France for architect Le Corbusier, followed by a struggle to find employment in Stockholm, Feininger turned his attention full-time to photography. He sold his first photos in 1932 and moved with his family to the United States in 1939. Feininger became a staff photographer in 1943 for LIFE magazine where he completed more than 430 assignments in a twenty year span.

Feininger’s works are known for their technique and panoramic grandeur. Such timeless images as the “New York Landscape Seen From Eight Miles Away in New Jersey”, taken in 1947, are notable for their harmony, balance, and grand scale. Through Feininger’s trained eye, the intricacies and beauty of both the natural and man-made world were magnified and intensified. His images revealed a new aesthetic of order and geometric perfection from the span of bridges to the symmetrical perfection of the skeleton of a carbon viper.